The Atlantic: The Internet ‘Narcissism Epidemic’

The Atlantic: The Internet ‘Narcissism Epidemic’

We suspect part of the rise in narcissism is being driven by Internet tools. What is clear is that social media platforms are frequently used by those with narcissistic tendencies to feed their egos. These same applications are used by millions of others to build their businesses, coordinate events, and maintain close ties with friends and families.

Social Isolation or Authetic Social Reintegration?

This week no one outside of my family and very close friends and a guy I have been seeing contacted me. I guess I also received some emails related to my startup but beyond that, nothing. I genuinely do not miss it. Without the mirror on the wall, I don’t find myself wondering who l should contact to feel a connection with the world. I suspect that all of the easy means of contact we create beget an appetite for meaningless and near effortless signs of life.

My week was full of community. At least the latter part. I spent time with friends and family and didn’t spend any time or energy on marginal relationships. I feel that not having a phone or facebook is forcing me to invest in real relationships.

I also don’t have a TV.

But guess what? A lot of people don’t because it’s expensive ($100 month for cable + buying the TV) and most of the stuff being aired isn’t any good. I also think TVs are eyesores in living rooms.

Anyway, one research group estimates that by the end of this year, nearly 5 million Americans will have have canceled their cable subscription and switched to all online sources like netflix and hulu. Like me. Read about it.

Psychology Today: SmartPhone Curbs Brain Activity

Psychology Today: SmartPhone Curbs Brain Activity

Consider the evidence from a study reported in late 2010 by researchers at McGill University. Neuroscientist Veronique Bohbot and her teamreported that relying on a global positioning system (GPS) to get to known locations reduces the function of the hippocampus, the “seahorse” shaped structure in the brain that controls memory and spatial orientation. Participants used to getting around on the basis of their own wits had higher activity and a greater volume in the hippocampus than the older adults using a GPS. What’s more, when it came to their actual performance, the non-GPS users performed better on a memory test. Bohbot recommends that you turn off the GPS when you’re navigating around your hometown and use it only for its actual purpose of finding locations you’ve never been to before. Your hippocampus will thank you, whether you’re 16 or 60.